THE ART OF ILLUSTRATION
CAZA

YERKA

BROM

WHELAN

CHICHONI

BERKEY
Some invest great part of their lives learning how to do tricky and challenging things, for passion, for proud, for willpower and unconsciously persuaded, from time to time, for express ideas that might become a human heritage. Among these people, often misunderstood or reviled, even envied, but rarely acclaimed, above all, emerge the artists.
Or better still, to be more accurate, only the artists. Namely those who know how to convey their emotions, their ideas, their fantasy, their taste, their technical skill into works positively fantastic and creative, before which itís not unusual to experience the same feelings and emotions that only nature can give, with the sweetness of its horizons, its dawns, its sunsets, and the violence of its cataclysms.
This becomes more evident if we consider the figurative art portrayed by the works of painters, sculptors, graphics and illustrators, where those feelings and emotions find their visual and physical representation.
Art, we were saying, thatís it! Because thatís what weíre talking about, art, leaving the hierarchy of values, mostly influenced by mysterious truths or by political and commercial accounts, out of consideration. There is not neither one major art nor a minor art, as many, for example, could consider the work of an artisan. Caravaggio, of course, is Caravaggio. Thatís undoubted. But to say it as it is, we must recognize that Caravaggio distinguishes himself from some of the modern illustrators, only because, having to produce for such a big variety of customers, they paint less religious subjects, or not at all.
Thatís why it felt appropriate to dedicate a section of this site to those being considered the most representative illustrators of our times; to pay them a well deserved tribute and express our sincere gratitude.
NASMITH

ROJO

VALLEJO

HUSS

FRAZETTA

PENNINGTON